To the right of the money pit was a glass case where candles could be lit for the benefit of lost loved ones. This set-up was similar to churches in the West. Next to the case was a series of drawers that contained fortunes. To determine one's fate, a container with icons inside is shaken and the person selects an icon. The icon leads the curious believer to a section of drawers and the draw that corresponds to his or her year of birth is opened. The fortune inside locks his fate, so to speak.

While looking for food, we noticed some commotion at a shrine next to the main temple. There a ceremony involved vibrantly dressed women who performed a dance to the music of traditional instruments. A priest-like person came out and waved a blessing Pope-style; there was more dancing, then the procession moved away from the shrine. The ceremony was beautifully serene and provided a real slice of Japanese life, past and present.

The Auto Salon sees more than 200,000 enthusiasts go through the turnstiles. Luckily, we had passes for VIP day, which gave us prime access to the show.

Our tour had a number of veterans who had arranged to do other things the day our group shot was snapped. Many stayed beyond the regularly scheduled departure, which inspired us to look into upping the ante in 2002.

The HKS Drag Supra stole the show big-time. The twin-turbo V8 flexed a number of innovative mods. We were impressed with the Toyota's electronically adjusted Koni rear shocks, air-shifted sequential gearbox, and innovative intercooler set-up; the engine's upper intake plenum with eight individual velocity stacks looked cool. Its 16 injector fuel system also impressed. The car is coming to America.

Our tour had a number of veterans who had arranged to do other things the day our group shot was snapped. Many stayed beyond the regularly scheduled departure, which inspired us to look into upping the ante in 2002.

Blitz had an interesting 9-second RX-7 in its booth, along with a healthy dose of turbochargers. Look for more on this stock-apex-sealed rotary in this issue of Turbo.

This Tom's-built MR2 Spyder impressed us with its radical lines and Tom's venerable air scoop treatment.

The marque on the march was the 2002 Subaru Impreza WRX. There we so many they looked like peeping Toms. We know the U.S. based Japanese tuners will churn out the WRX gear but will the Japan-based manufacturers and tuners jump on the bandwagon in America?

Bomex unveiled its Integra body tuning kit and looks to have a winner on its hands.

Building a fuel system? Here's how to do it right.

RVs, micro and mini vans were the big trend at the 2001 Tokyo Auto Salon. The entire second hall was filled with them. We think they're cool, and wish the OEs would send us some.

The bodywork on this Nissan Silvia was trick. The car had the goods under the hood as well.

Godzilla spotted! For the first time since our 1998 tour, that reptilian troublemaker Godzilla was spotted in a clearing just south of the Makuhari Messe. Rumor has it he later trashed an indoor skiing facility adjacent to Tokyo Bay.

TRD was on hand and while the Altezza was still a player at the Salon, the Subaru was the rising star.

The Skyline GT-R is the one constant of the Salon. Since we started doing the tour in 1997, the GT-R has been a dominating force.

Trust, the parent company of GReddy Performance Products, had a big spread at the show. Unfortunately, Stephan Papadakis, who was on our tour, was not on the Trust stage dancing this year. We hope to see his new moves at the 2002 show.

They make great products, but need a translator in the marketing department.