Pros
The Evo X made its debut to the general public in January. Designed with an all-new 4B11/T powerplant, the Evo X offers some promising performance results straight from the showroom to the track. The factory-rated 291 hp and 300 lb-ft of torque 2.0L mill was engineered to pump out an impressive 145.5 hp per liter displacement. The largest horsepower per liter in its class. Among numerous refinements and improvements from the previous 4G63 powerplant to the new 4B11 unit is the use of a MIVEC variable valve timing system used on both intake and exhaust camshafts, whereas its previous ancestor only used one.

Cons
The release of the new Evo X meant uncharted territory for those who were once familiar with the previous generation Mitsubishis. The factory ECM is one realm of uncertainty among many aftermarket performance tuners. We've even received word that Mitsubishi has kept their ECU schematics under lock and key even months after the car was released. While the tuning aspects remain a mystery, we can assume it's only a few months before a performance shop or brainiac engineer learns to unlock the ECM's code.

Dyno Test Results
Strapped to the dyno, we made a series of pulls to obtain a good baseline horsepower rating. At the Dynamic Autosports Mustang dyno, known by many to be one of the more stingier dynos in California, the car belted out 237 hp and 247 lb-ft of torque.

Product
Exhaust, mid-pipe, nuts and bolts, gaskets, stickers

Installation Time
60 minutes

Pros
We were lucky enough to receive the new 5Zigen ZZ exhaust for our Evo X as it came fresh off the boat the day before our scheduled test date. The 5Zigen ZZ exhaust system consists of a SUS034 stainless steel canister and 100mm tip with an integrated silencer designed within the unit to keep decibels within legal limits for California usage. The B-pipe is comprised of a full stainless SUS436 and is 60.5mm in diameter. Along with some performance improvements, the ZZ exhaust has some visual appeal as well. The factory exhaust tip units were designed with a more oval appearance, while the 5Zigen ZZ setup was fabricated with the sportier round tips.

Cons
The 60.5mm B-pipe section was similar in size to the factory unit. 5Zigen specifically designed such a small main pipe diameter due to new Japan JASMA (government regulation) laws. Companies such as 5Zigen sell axel-back units with the B-pipe as an optional unit in Japan. While Japan's exhaust setup is sold in two separate pieces, the U.S. version is sold as a catback setup. 5Zigen also plans to release a 70.5mm single outlet unit as a race version within the next few months for the Evo X. Installation of the exhaust can be a pain in the ass if you attempt to tackle the project on your own. We suggest getting assistance from a friend or neighbor to help speed up the process. A can of WD40 comes a long way when finagling the rubber exhaust bushings off the old system and onto the new unit.

Dyno Test Results
The Evo X responded well to the new exhaust setup, as peak power and torque figures increased by 4 hp and 4 lb-ft of torque. Lower rpm figures remained consistent with stock dyno numbers but we noticed a change at 4,350 rpm with an increase of 7 hp and 6 lb-ft of torque. Both torque and horsepower numbers maintained a consistent range of 7 to 9 hp up until 4,810 rpm. An increase was present once again at 5,230 rpm as dyno charts show the largest margin in pickup of 11 hp and 10 lb-ft of torque at 6,200 rpm, and once gain at 6,620 rpm as we see a steady increase in numbers continue till redline.

Product
Intake, K&N air filter, crankcase breather hose, four-ply silicone couplers, silicone BOV return hose, hose clamps, stickers, and instructions

Installation Time
70 minutes